Feb 29, 2024  
2023-2024 Catalog 
    
2023-2024 Catalog

Courses Offered on Demand


The following courses may be offered on demand:

ACRT 112 - Non-Structural Repair I . 7 Hours (200 Contact Hours). The student will learn the rules regarding general shop safety, major structural construction of an automobile, use of body shop hand tools, as well as safe use and maintenance of air and fluid equipment and accessories.

ACRT-117. Collision Orientation and Safety . 3 Hours (45 Contact Hours). This course covers the rules regarding safety in the use of hand and power tools.

ACRT-207. On-the-Job Training (OJT or OJT Equivalent) . 3 Hours. Students demonstrating excellent attendance, attitude and mastery of core curriculum competencies may be considered for on-the-job training experience. Through the cooperation of local businesses, students are given the opportunity to apply the skills required for their future career. Class attendance is also required.

AGRI 125 - Agricultural Accounting and Taxes . 2 Hours. Fundamentals of accounting related to farm use and keeping accurate records.

AGRI-150. Horse Science . 3 Hours. This course is designed to acquaint students with the horse and the horse industry. Areas studied will include: functions, selection, types, breeds, classes, breeding, feeding, buildings and equipment, health training, horsemanship, management and business aspects of the horse.

AGRI-167. Equine Management . 3 Hours. Covers areas normally needed in management and training of horses.

AGRI 182 - Livestock Selection II . 3 Hours. As an extension of Livestock Selection I, this includes evaluation and selection of live, domestic farm animals and function of red meat species in relation to carcass merit. Included is collegiate competition during the spring semester. Prerequisite: Livestock Selection I or consent of instructor.

AGRI 211 - Crop Science . 4 Hours. Basic production principles for agronomic crops, including corn, soybeans, sorghum, wheat, native and forage grasses will be discussed. Culture needs of various crops, crop rotations, soil preparation and fertilization, selecting varieties, preventing pests, harvesting and storing crops will be included. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and one credit hour of lab.

AGRI-228. Marketing Agricultural Products . 3 Hours. This course is designed to acquaint the student with alternative forms of marketing agricultural products. Emphasis is placed on the futures and options markets to price livestock and grain commodities. Includes analyzing market potential and simulating trading positions in the market. Prerequisite: Principles of Agricultural Economics.

AGRI-257. Applications of Global Positioning Systems . 3 Hours. This course studies fundamental processes of global positioning systems and geographic information systems with the primary interest on agriculture applications. General technical aspects of GPS satellites, differential correction and hardware will be covered. Agricultural mapping, navigation, variable rate technology and yield monitoring will be discussed.

AGRI-267. Introduction to Geographical Information Systems . 3 Hours. This course studies fundamental processes of Geographical Information Systems using the ArcGIS software. An emphasis on agriculture and the application of this software will be used in this course. This course presents the historical development of desktop GIS mapping and continues with hands-on experience in a computer lab using ArcView software. Students will complete exercises using all the components of ArcView.

AGRI-291. Artificial Insemination of Cattle Seminar .
1 Hour. Consists of actual breeding of cattle by artificial insemination. Proper technique and sanitation are emphasized. The course includes a review of the female bovine reproductive tract and estrus cycle.

ARTS-143. Design II . 3 Hours. This a continuation of the course in Introduction to Design I. Prerequisite: Introduction to Design I.

ARTS-148. History of Modern Art . 3 Hours. A survey course that encompasses the study of the visual arts for the past 100 years.

ARTS-154. The History of African American Art .
3 Hours. This is an introductory course designed to acquaint the beginning student with the knowledge needed to gain a general understanding of African American art. This course provides information on philosophical, economic and cultural aspects of African American art and a review of the history of African American art in the U.S. Emphasis in this course is placed on the historical contributions of African American art to American culture.

ARTS-170. Introduction to Watercolor Painting .
3 Hours. An introductory studio course in watercolor techniques. Subject matter is still-life and the human figure, plus on-location landscape.

ARTS-211. Adventure Photography . 2 Hours. This course is designed to take the student photographer from his or her level of experience to a more advanced level of photography while developing a desire for life-long learning. Through photographic exploration students will apply basic and advanced photography skills to record an adventure.

ASTC-150. Engine Repair . 6 Hours. This course is designed to provide theory of operation, diagnostic procedures, maintenance, and rebuilding procedures of automotive engines. Instruction includes valve grinding, installation of cam bearings, fitting rod and main bearings, and safety procedures.

ASTC-170. Automatic Transmission . 4 Hours. This course is designed to train the student in theory, safety, diagnosis, and repair of automatic transmissions and tansaxles. Instruction in operation, diagnosis, and repair of automatic transmission will be offered in this course.

ASTC-283. Manual Transmissions and Axles . 6 Hours. This course is designed to train students in theory, safety, diagnosis and repair of manual drive trains, transaxles, axles, drive shafts and components associated with the systems. Diagnosis and repair of clutch systems and related components will be offered in this course.

AVIA-105. Private Pilot Ground Training . 3 Hours. This course covers airplane operation and performance, meteorology, communications and FAA regulations, navigation and emergency procedures. This course should prepare a student to pass the FAA written test for a private pilot’s license.

AVIA-106. Private Pilot Flight Training . 2 Hours. This instruction will involve both dual and solo for a total minimum number of flying hours of 35. There are three cross country flights of which two are dual and one is solo. Certain flight proficiencies must be exhibited before the flight instructor will recommend that the student take the FAA flight test. Upon the successful completion of this flight test and if he has previously passed the FAA written examination, he will be issued a private pilot’s license by the FAA. Prerequisite: Class III medical certificate.

AVIA-208. Commercial and Instrument Pilot: Ground Training . 3 Hours. FAA regulations, the Airman’s Information Manual and Advanced Meteorology in preparation for the FAA commercial written test is included. The instrumental portion covers instruments and systems, with flight sheets, IFR planning and VOR flight, ILD and ADF approaches, IFR regulations and procedure, IFR Clearance shorthand. Prerequisite: Additional training in navigation.

AVIA-209. Commercial Pilot Flight Training . 4 Hours. An additional 125 hours of flying must be obtained over and above that obtained for the private pilot’s license. This will involve both dual and solo, and a much greater flight proficiency will be expected from the student before he will be allowed to take the commercial flight test. The student must have passed the commercial written examination before the flight test will be given. Extensive cross country flights will be made into controlled airports and under the jurisdiction of the airway Traffic Control Center. Prerequisite: Private Pilot’s license or equivalent, Class II medical Certificate.

BCTC-100. Keyboarding I . 2 Hours. This course provides instruction in developing the basic keyboarding skills needed to key alphabetic, numeric, and special symbol characters, as well as teaching the skills needed to use a 10-key keypad. This course is designed to meet the needs of individuals who are beginners as well as for those who desire to improve their basic keyboarding skills. The emphasis is on the development of the techniques for building speed and accuracy on straight-copy timings.

BCTC-101. Keyboarding II . 3 Hours. This is a course structured to give a student the fundamental skills and knowledge necessary to continue his/her study in keyboarding, or to acquire keyboarding skills for their own personal use. Students will learn to format personal letters, business letters, outlines, reports, data sheets and tables. Prerequisite: Keyboarding I.

BCTC-102. Keyboarding III . 3 Hours. This course is designed for students who wish to develop speed and accuracy required for office employment. Prerequisite: Keyboarding I and II or consent of instructor.

BCTC-107. Medical Keyboarding . 3 Hours. This course is designed to help students learn about preparing and processing medical forms and to aid students in becoming knowledgeable about the skills necessary for obtaining and keeping a position in a medical office, hospital or extended care facility. Prerequisite: Keyboarding III, Microcomputer Applications II/WordPerfect and consent of instructor.

BCTC-108. Word Processing I . 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide students with an orientation to word processing concepts including hands-on applications and skill development. Students will use Microsoft Word as the primary course software for exploration in word processing. Course will prepare students for testing to become Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certified in Word Specialist.

BCTC-111. Word Processing I . 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide students with an orientation to word processing concepts including hands-on applications and skill development. Students will use Microsoft Word as the primary course software for exploration in word processing. Course will prepare students for testing to become Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certified in Word Specialist.

BCTC-113. Business Procedures I  . 5 Hours. This course covers competencies in Administrative Assistant I and Business Document Production. This world demands that the administrative professional have not only technology skills but also a broad range of human relation skills (including verbal and written communication) and critical-thinking skills. Due to the ever-changing nature of our world, the administrative professional must also commit to continual learning. By using and learning from the broad range of activities presented in this course, you will be better equipped to meet the demands of that world.

BCTC-119 . Word Processing II. 4 hours. An advanced course including mail-merge features in word processing (merging documents, sorting, and selecting data), importing/exporting documents, advanced macros and XML. The use of templates, styles, tables, columns, and other beyond-the-basic word processing features will also be covered. Students will use Microsoft Word as the primary course software for exploration in word processing. Course will prepare students for testing to become Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certified in Word Expert.

BCTC-121. Job Search Skills Class . 2 Hours. This course provides instruction for skills required to look for and obtain a job. Resume preparation, survey of
job market opportunities, interview techniques and application completion will be covered.

BCTC-122. Business English . 3 Hours. This course provides an intensive review of the rules governing written communications. Included in this review is grammar, sentence structure, subject and verb
agreement, punctuation, abbreviations, capitalization and number expression.

BCTC-123. Business Procedures II . 5 Hours. This course introduces a variety of units to provide the student with critical thinking skills in the area of accessing and managing information, and the transfer of learned concepts. A variety of units will be covered, including Business Mathematics and Computer Literacy.

BCTC-128. Spelling Improvement . 1 Hour. This course gives the student reasons why words are misspelled and what should be done in each area for improvemen

BCTC-130. Computer Applications I . 7 Hours (190 Contact Hours). This course is designed to provide students with in-depth training in word processing concepts. Students will use Microsoft Word as the primary course soft-ware. This course will prepare students for testing to become Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certified at the core and expert levels of Word.

BCTC-141. Presentation Software I . 3 Hours (85 Contact Hours). This course covers the creation of professional quality slide presentations. Students will create computer based slide presentations, transparencies, 35mm slides, audience handouts, and speaker notes. Use of templates, pictures, charts, sound & video will also be included. Students will use Microsoft PowerPoint as the primary course software for exploration in word processing. Course will prepare students for testing to become Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certified in PowerPoint.

BCTC-143. Business Procedures III . 5 Hours. This world demands that the administrative professional have not only technology skills but also a broad range of human relation skills (including verbal and written communication) and critical-thinking skills. Due to the ever-changing nature of our world, the administrative professional must also commit to continual learning. By using and learning from the broad range of activities presented in this course, you will be better equipped to
meet the demands of that world. Getting and keeping a job requires the ability to communicate effectively and efficiently in many different situations. This course will help prepare you to meet these communication necessities through business communications.
Business English will provide the opportunity to learn how to communicate effectively in the business world. As a continuation to the foundations of developing sentences and paragraphs, students will learn the appropriate approach to capture the message necessary for effective communication

BCTC-145. Accounting for Small Business (Practice Simulation) . 3 Hours. This course reinforces skills learned in Introduction to Computerized Accounting Software. Students will develop and maintain a simple set of books to strengthen learning.

BCTC-150. Presentation Software II. 4 Hours (105 Contact Hours) . This course covers the creation of professional quality slide presentations. Students will create advanced computer based slide presentations, transparencies, 35mm slides, audience handouts, and speaker notes. Use of templates, pictures, charts, sound & video will also be included. Course will prepare students for testing to become Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certified in PowerPoint.

BUSN-154. Computerized Accounting . 3 Hours. This course is designed to teach how the computer can be used as an accounting tool. It is not intended to teach any new accounting concepts, but rather how accounting procedures can be applied through computer applications with the use of a general ledger software package. Also included are modules for accounts receivable and payable, payroll and asset management. Prerequisite: Financial Accounting or permission of instructor.

BCTC-160. Spreadsheet Applications I . 3 Hours. This course covers beginning software training in the utilization of Microsoft Excel for integrating activities that are experienced in the workplace. Students will prepare for testing at the beginning level of certification in Microsoft Office Specialist in Excel.

BCTC-163. Applied Communications . 3 Hours. This course is designed to help the student develop and refine career related communications skills.

BCTC-173. Business Procedures IV . 5 Hours. This course will prepare students to use appropriate and successful strategies for seeking and obtaining employment. Students will identify their personality type, interests, skills and values; define goals for their lives; and match themselves to career and educational goals and plans. Participants will plan a job search, create a resume, write a cover letter, build a professional profile, write a letter of application, and prepare for and practice a job interview. Students will explore
workplace ethics, cultural differences, and social behaviors in business settings.

BCTC-175. Spreadsheet Applications II . 4 Hours. This course covers expert level software training in the utilization of Microsoft Excel for integrating activities that are experienced in the workplace. Students will prepare for testing at the advanced level of certification in Microsoft Office Specialist in Excel.

BCTC-180. Computer Applications II . 7 Hours. In this course, students will explore the advanced features of Microsoft PowerPoint, including customizing templates and the PowerPoint environment, as well as making a presentation interactive by using hyperlinks. The student will enhance a presentation by using custom clip art, animation, and movies, and work with embedded and imported objects using Microsoft applications. Working in the Windows environment, disk and file management, and the Internet will be presented. This course covers all the objectives for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) exams to prepare students for testing.

BCTC-184. Basic Web Page Design . 4 Hours. This is an introductory course in Web Page Design. The course will provide students with a strong understanding of web design principles in the planning, building and maintaining of web pages and a web site. Students will design and create web pages using web page editing/publishing software and create and edit graphic images for web pages using image editing software. Upon completion of course, students should be able to apply principles of good web page design and style. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

BCTC-190. Computer Applications III . 7 Hours. This course offers training in the features and functions of Microsoft Excel in a professional environment. Advanced techniques for analyzing and manipulating data in Excel will help prepare students for testing to become Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) certified at the core and expert levels of Excel.

BCTC-197. Time Management Workshop . 1 Hour. Designed to help participants learn a process of effective time management.

BCTC-200. Computer Applications IV . 7 Hours. At the conclusion of this Office course, students will understand how to use the basic and advanced capabilities of Access to build databases, query data, design forms and generate reports. The course covers all the objectives for the Microsoft Office Specialist (MOS) exams to prepare students for testing.

BCTC-203. Vocabulary Improvement . 1 Hour. This course helps the student improve business vocabulary skills. Students may add hundreds of words to their vocabularies and gain a vocabulary-attack skill by the study of Latin and Greek roots.

BCTC-207. On-the-Job Training (OJT or OJT Equivalent) . Up to 4 Hours. Students demonstrating excellent attendance, attitude and mastery of core curriculum competencies may be considered for on-the-job training experience. Through the cooperation of local businesses, students are given the opportunity to apply the skills required for their future career. Class attendance is also required.

BCTC-215. Database Management I . 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide students with an orientation to database concepts including hands-on applications and skill development. Students will use Microsoft Access as the primary course software for exploration in database production. Course will prepare students for testing to become Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) certified in Access Specialist.

BCTC-219. Machine Transcription . 2 Hours. This course is designed to prepare students with entry-level job proficiency using transcribing and dictating machines. Students will learn to proofread and edit business documents, improve English competencies, develop awareness of career opportunities in word processing and gain an understanding of the importance of written communication in the business world. Prerequisite: Keyboarding III and Microcomputer Applications II/WordPerfect.

BCTC-220. Medical Machine Transcriptions . 3 Hours.
This course prepares a student to become a transcriptionist in medical offices, clinics, hospitals and other health facilities. Through 60 prerecorded exercises students become familiar with the following areas of medical transcription: history and physical reports, radiology, operations, pathology, discharge summaries and autopsies. Prerequisite: Medical Terminology I.

BCTC-222. Business Communications . 3 Hours. This course covers how to communicate in writing as well as orally and nonverbally. The fundamentals of how to write the different types of business letters, memos and reports will be covered. Prerequisite: Student must successfully complete Business English or have consent of instructor to enroll.

BCTC-226. Database Management II . 4 Hours
(105 Contact Hours). This course is designed to provide students with hands-on applications and skill
development in database concepts. As a continuation, the advanced features of Access will be addressed so
students will gain knowledge of how to best use the advanced features helping to build databases that can support a business well into the future. Features such as customizing forms, pivot tables, pivot charts, indexes, and security levels, encrypting, and importing data from other software as well. Students will use Microsoft Access as the primary course software for exploration in database production. Course will prepare students
for testing to become Microsoft Office User Specialist (MOUS) certified in Access Expert.

BCTC-230. Medical Office Procedures. 6 Hours This course introduces students to Insurance Forms
eparation, ICD-9/CPT-4 Coding and completion of Medical Office Simulations.

BCTC-251. Desktop Publishing Software I . 3 Hours.
This course will expose students to a comprehensive understanding of Adobe Photoshop.Students will develop creative projects through concise instructions, and complete coverage of basic to advanced Photoshop skills to help students create dynamic Photoshop art.

BCTC-252. Desktop Publishing Software II . 4 Hours. This course will expose students to a comprehensive understanding of Adobe Photoshop. Students will develop creative projects through concise instructions, and complete coverage of advanced Photoshop skills to help students create dynamic Photoshop art.

BCTC-255. Medical Terminology I . 3 Hours. This course provides an introduction to the medical terms most commonly used in today’s medical office. It serves as an adjunct to other medical courses for nurses, medical technologists, laboratory assistants and medically related professionals, including community health workers and medical social workers. It is useful to students in biology, health, anatomy, physiology, nursing and pre-med.

BCTC-270. Desktop Publishing Software . 7 Hours. This course is designed to identify the concepts and applications of desktop publishing and develop competencies using powerful computer software as a desktop publishing tool. A variety of software packages will be examined. Students will learn how to combine text and graphics to create professional quality documents.

BCTC-275. Document Layout & Design . 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to computer applications and systems that are used in the production of printed media. A variety of software packages will be used to produce professional quality documents. Students will learn to analyze, critique and improve graphic design and layout to communicate a message. Prerequisite: Computer applications I.

BIOL-104. Environmental Science Lab . 2 Hours. The Environmental Science Laboratory offers a variety of experiences that demonstrate the principles, processes, techniques, and technologies in environmental science. Students will use scientific methods to study basic ecological concepts and human activities contribution to environmental problems. Students must be enrolled in BIOL-103 to take this course. Co-requisite: BIOL-103

BIOL-123. Anatomy and Physiology  . 5 Hours. This course covers the study of the structure and functions of the parts of the human body. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. Prerequisite: General Biology or permission of instructor.

BIOL-201. General Zoology . 5 Hours. This course covers the structure and function of animals. Principles of relationship, heredity, environment, geographic distribution and economic importance are considered. Representative types of animal life are dissected. The course includes three credit hours of lecture and two credit hours of lab. This course is designed for Biology majors. A strong high school biology background or General Biology is recommended.

BUSN-111. Practical Accounting . 3 Hours. This course is designed for the non-accounting major. The course includes bookkeeping procedures using the double entry bookkeeping method. Emphasis will be placed on the accounting cycle, cash control and payroll records.

BUSN-112. Principles of Retailing I . 3 Hours. This course deals with skills of managing and operating a retail business. The course includes sections on opportunities in retailing, establishing a retail store and merchandise management. Emphasis is placed on
analysis of buying and pricing merchandise, inventory control, store location and terminology used in retailing.

BUSN-129. Supervisory Skills . 1 Hour. Provides guidance and skill practice to enable a supervisor to develop positive, mature methods of handling employee problems.

BUSN-130. Business Seminar . 2 Hours. The student receives two hours credit for successfully completing over 225 hours of approved work experience in an approved job station for pay or a workshop related to job experience. Students develop skills in a directly or indirectly related employment area similar to their career goal. Emphasis is placed on development of management skills and attitudes useful to gainful employment in business.

BUSN-131. Accounting I . 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to basic accounting concepts, and includes the collecting, recording and reporting of data. Emphasis is placed on proprietorship records. It is designed for students with little or no prior knowledge of bookkeeping or accounting. It will benefit students from all disciplines. This course will assist in career development for accounting majors and students from other fields of study.

BUSN-132. Accounting II . 3 Hours. This course is a continuation of Accounting I and includes introduction to partnerships and corporate accounting. Also, basic principles of managerial accounting are introduced. Prerequisite: Accounting I.

BUSN-140. Principles of Banking . 3 Hours. A basic course in the organization and operation of commercial banks and the Federal Reserve System. Recent monetary and banking trends are emphasized.

BUSN-149. Business Seminar: Studies in Finance and Economics Application . 3 Hours. This course provides an analysis of topics important to successful business operations. Politics in the organization, stress management, time management, team building and constructive use of conflict are included in the course. This course is “application” oriented and provides valuable work experience to the student.

BUSN-150. Real Estate . 3 Hours. Real Estate is designed for students who have an interest in the real estate field. The course consists of a comprehensive view of fundamental real estate procedures, will aid the student in understanding the process of obtaining a
real estate sales license and will help the student gain the minimum knowledge and skills required to execute simple, personal real estate transactions.

BUSN-160. Payroll Accounting . 3 Hours. Payroll Accounting is a study of the current payroll tax laws and the records that are required by these laws. The course will study various methods of payroll calculations, payroll deductions, payroll record keeping and the reporting of payroll information. Prerequisite: Financial Accounting or consent of instructor.

BUSN-167. Total Quality Management . 3 Hours. This course will give students exposure to the total quality management concept. It is designed to increase participants’ knowledge of quality improvement basics as well as an in-depth study of Dr. Deming and his theories. Students will study other TQM philosophies and compare and contrast them with those of Dr. Deming.

BUSN-168. Team Building . 3 Hours. This course is a practical guide to working in or with project teams. It is comprehensive, using step-by-step instructions, illustrations and worksheets as well as other hands-on activities. The student will experience projects from the inception to closure. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

BUSN-174. Applied Math for Technical Programs . 3 Hours. This course is designed to help vocational students and other career-minded students develop and refine job-related mathematics skills. The course includes material on arithmetic operations, problem-solving techniques, estimation of answers, data analysis and graphing, measurement skills, unit analysis, and some basic geometry.

BUSN-176. Experiential Leadership . 1 Hour. This course involves a series of activities that require various degrees of teamwork, fun, trust, cooperation and communication. Each activity will have an objective for the group to obtain. These goals will vary and be established by the instructor. Every task will be followed by oral discussion. Whenever possible analogies will be made toward “real life” situations.

BUSN 182 - E-commerce . 3 Hours. This course provides a survey of the emergence of e-commerce to present.

BUSN-235. Project Management . 3 Hours. This course provides the fundamental skills and techniques
needed to successfully plan and implement self-managed projects.

BUSN-280. Effective Business Presentations . 3 Hours. This course prepares the student to make presentations in a business setting. Topics covered will include essentials of PowerPoint and Astound, as well as the foundations of delivering a speech.

BUSN-281. Change . 3 Hours. This course prepares the student to become a change agent even when not in control of change itself; to view change as an opportunity rather than a threat or danger. Students will learn to develop specific strategies which will help them move forward in change rather than become victims of organizational change.

CADT-102. Technical Drafting I . 5 Hours (130 Contact Hours). This course is designed to acquaint students with the techniques used in drafting based on ANSI/ASME standards. It includes engineering lettering, line conventions, orthographic projection and dimensioning practices. It encompasses the basic concepts and techniques of technical drafting as well as the use and knowledge of supplies and equipment.

CADT-107. Computer Aided Design I . 5 Hours (130 Contact Hours). Basic computer operations are covered along with data handling, command structure and the coordinate system. Design geometry is studied along with ANSI/ASME design standards. Entity draw commands are introduced along with edit and layering commands.

CADT-120. Technical Drafting II . 6 Hours (150 Contact Hours). The concepts of blocks and external referencing are introduced in this course. Assigning attributes and creating a Bill of Material is implemented. Dimensioning is exhibited within the problems and assignments.

CADT-165. Lab Math and Communications I . 3 Hours
(90 Contact Hours). This course introduces the student to basic mathematics including design concepts using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, metric and measurements. In algebra, the student studies design concepts including signed numbers, basic algebraic operations, simple and complex equations. Communications will cover basic design documents such as problem layouts, invoices, bid sheets and parts listing.

CADT-170. Computer Aided Design II . 6 Hours (150 Contact Hours). This course teaches students how to obtain information about a drawing. Standard text fonts are introduced along with file handling. Drawing concepts such as orthographic production are explained and used. Prerequisite: Computer Aided Design I.

CADT 207 - On-the-Job Training (OJT or OJT Equivalent) . 3 Hours (0-195 Contact Hours). Students are placed at on-site training locations in cooperation with local businesses. This allows students to gain skills working in their field while still attending classes. Minimum competencies in core curriculum must be maintained. Attendance must be excellent and a professional attitude demonstrated before students will be considered for this opportunity.

CADT-214. Technical Drafting III . 5 Hours (140 Contact Hours). Developing views, auxiliary and sectioning are studied as part of the concepts of basic design methods. Basic fit tolerancing and computer generated algebra are introduced. Dimensioning is exhibited within the problems and assignments.

CADT-217. Technical Drafting IV . 5 Hours (140 Contact Hours). This course covers pictorial drawings that include three-dimensional and isometric applications implemented with wire frame/extrusion computer generated techniques. Computer generated geometry is introduced. Dimensioning is exhibited within the problems and assignments.

CADT-225. Computer Aided Design III . 5 Hours (140 Contact Hours). This course teaches students how to obtain information about a drawing through the operating system. Standard drawing scales are introduced along with file handling. Drawing concepts of geometric shapes are explained and used along with dimensioning. Prerequisite: Computer Aided Design II.

CADT-227. Computer Aided Design IV . 5 Hours (140 Contact Hours). This course covers three-dimensional construction and display. It also provides instruction in 3D modeling commands and various customizing techniques. The outcomes are aimed at increasing the productivity and enhancing the use of AutoCAD commands and techniques. Prerequisite: Computer Aided Design III.

CADT-247. Architectural Drafting and Design . 5 Hours (140 Contact Hours). The fundamentals of architectural drafting are introduced in this course. Prerequisite: Computer Aided Design IV.

CADT-252. Electrical and Electronic Drafting and Design . 5 Hours (140 Contact Hours). The fundamentals of electrical and electronic drafting and design are introduced in this course. Prerequisite: Computer Aided Design IV.

CADT-257. Civil Drafting and Design . 5 Hours (140 Contact Hours). The fundamentals of civil drafting and design are introduced in this course. Prerequisite: Computer Aided Design IV.

CADT-265. Lab Math and Communications II . 3 Hours (90 Contact Hours). This course introduces the student to geometry, including design concepts using angle measurement, geometric principles, triangles, polygons and geometric construction. In trigonometry, the student studies design concepts including trigonometric functions with right triangles. Communications will cover advanced design documents such as response letters, output resumes and applications.

CMAD-105. Certified Medication Aide (CMA) .
3 Hours (75 Contact Hours). This is a 75-hour course designed to teach the concepts of correct medication administration for the purpose of administering medications in a long-term care facility under the supervision of a professional nurse. Must be 18 years old and a certified nurse aide to enroll. Student must pass a state test at the completion of the course to become certified to pass medications.

CNAD-100. Certified Nurse Aide (CNA) . 4 Hours (90 Contact Hours). This is a 90-hour training course designed to provide the skills needed to become a Kansas certified nurse aide. It will include training in direct patient care in all areas to fulfill their activities of daily living. Must be at least 16 years of age.

CNAD-110. Social Service Designee . 1 Hour (36 Contact Hours). This course provides an overview of the bio-psychosocial aging process and addresses the role of the activity and social service departments
in resident care, the health care team concept, communication skills, regulatory standards, protocols, conflict resolution, and management principles. This course prepares the student for the role of Social Service Designee in a long-term care facility as the person accountable to designated consultants.

CNAD-120. Activity Director . 1 Hour (36 Contact Hours). This course prepares the student for the duties of an Activity Director. The Activity Director is responsible for the scheduling and presentation of a variety of activities for residents of long-term care facilities, hospitals, assisted living facilities, etc. Must be able to implement a plan of care to improve or restore Activities of Daily Living (ADL).

CNAD-150. Phlebotomy . 1 Hour (40 Contact Hours). This course is designed for phlebotomists, laboratory technologists and those who train phlebotomy teams. Discussion will emphasize those basic skills necessary to properly obtain, by venipuncture or capillary puncture, and handle adequate blood specimens for clinical laboratory testing. It is the goal of this course to provide a general overview and update on those techniques, procedures and issues to the collection of blood specimens for routine clinical laboratory testing in order to develop well-trained, proficient and professional phlebotomists. Blood-drawing techniques, specimen requirements, specimen handling procedures and patient contact recommendations will vary with the institution being served.

CNST-207. On-the-Job Training (OJT or OJT Equivalent) . 3 Hours (150 Contact Hours). Students demonstrating excellent attendance, attitude and mastery of core curriculum competencies may be considered for on-the-job training experience. Through the cooperation of local businesses, students are given the opportunity to apply the skills required for their future career. Class attendance is also required.

COMM-105. Broadcasting Sales . 3 Hours. This is a course that prepares the student for broadcast/cable sales careers in today’s highly competitive markets. The course deals with realistic, practical background knowledge and tips on selling techniques needed for success in large and small markets. Practical application will be stressed as well as implementation of tools and techniques.

COMM-110. Writing for the Mass Media . 3 Hours. This course is designed to give an overview of journalism with emphasis on how news is gathered and written for the various communication media. Developing news judgment, learning observation skills, interviewing and other methods of gathering information, assuming responsibility and acquiring a writing style are all parts of the course. Mechanics such as grammar, spelling, punctuation and sentence structure will be emphasized. With instructor permission, student will be permitted to work on College publications and other campus publications.

COMM-111. Publication Production . 2 Hours. Participants in this course will be responsible for the production of a CCC publication. Activities are as follows: soliciting and selecting those materials to be published (i.e. editing); designing the publication’s pages; fitting the texts accepted for publication to the design parameters (i.e. layout); advertising the finished product (i.e. marketing).

COMM-115. Advanced Writing for the Mass Media . 3 Hours. Intensive course emphasizing reportorial principles and practices. Students enrolled in this class should expect to receive expanded assignments and more advanced writing projects. Students will be assigned projects that can be published in College publications and The Coffeyville Journal. Prerequisite: Writing for the Mass Media.

COMM-151. Introduction to Television Continuity . 3 Hours. This is an entry-level course dealing with writing and producing scripts for radio and television broadcasting. Different types of commercials are studied as well as consumer motivation, legal and ethical issues, promotions, public service announcements and copywriter qualifications. The course is designed to give students an idea of actual working conditions at various sizes of stations. Students perform exercises that incorporate the skills taught in each chapter. Since each chapter builds on the previous ones, material learned in earlier exercises is utilized in later assignments.

COMM-205. Broadcast Announcing . 3 Hours. This is a three credit hour course dealing with techniques and skills essential for a successful radio or television announcer. Areas to be covered are ad-libbing, working with equipment, pronunciation, voice usage and other specialized techniques, from news reporting to play-by-play sports announcing. The class will consist of lecture from the required text and performance training in class and in the television studio.

COMM-261. Broadcast Operations . 3 Hours. This course is designed to further train the Communications and Broadcasting Technology student. The student must have already taken Video Principles for Multi-Media. The course will deal primarily with advanced techniques in station operations. The student, by working a regular shift at the College-owned TV station, will attain valuable “hands-on” experience. The course will present ideas and practical knowledge as well as provide the how and whys of special electronic potentials of video equipment. One of the primary duties of the student will be to insert locally produced programming into the regular broadcast schedule of the station. There is also much time spent on sharpening editing and other production skills. The student should gain a fresh perspective on video’s conventional working methods that will help him/her attain greater control and personal expression using today’s technology. Prerequisite: Video Principles for Multi-Media.

COMM-262. TV Internship - News . 2 Hours. This course is designed to further train the Communications and Broadcasting Technology student. The student must have already taken Video Principles for Multi-Media. The course will deal primarily with advanced techniques in broadcast news. The student, by working a regular shift at a TV station, will attain valuable “hands-on” experience. The course will present ideas and practical knowledge as well as provide the how and whys of special electronic potentials of video equipment. In this course the student will assume the position of a news reporter at a local television station. There is also considerable time spent on sharpening editing and other production skills. The student should gain a fresh perspective on video’s conventional working methods that will help to attain greater control and personal expression using today’s technology. While the student is at the television station, he/she will be under direct supervision of the news director. Prerequisite: Video Principles for Multi-Media, Video Production Applications and Introduction to Mass Communications.

COMM-263. TV Internship - Production . 2 Hours. This course is designed to further train the Communications and Broadcasting Technology student. The student must have already taken Video Principles for Multi-Media, Video Production Applications and Introduction to Mass Communications. The course will deal primarily with advanced techniques in commercial TV production. The student, by working a regular shift at a TV station, will attain valuable “hands-on” experience. The course will present ideas and practical knowledge as well as provide the how and whys of special electronic potentials of video equipment. In this course the student will assume a position in the commercial production department at a local television station. There is also considerable time spent on sharpening editing and other production skills. The student should gain a fresh perspective on video’s conventional working methods that will help to attain greater control and personal expression using today’s technology. While the student is at the television station, he/she will be under direct supervision of the production manager. Prerequisite: Video Principles for Multi-Media, Video Production Applications and Introduction to Mass Communications.

COMP-191. Adobe PageMaker . 3 Hours. The Adobe PageMaker program is a program widely accepted among designers, graphic designers, writers, editors and typesetters as a tool to integrate text and graphics from many sources into virtually any kind of publication, from newsletters and brochures to color catalogs and magazines, with maximum precision and control. In this course the student will be expected to learn and explore the creative and practical possibilities of the program. The student will learn the basic functions and applications of the Adobe PageMaker program.

COMP-195. Principles of Web Page Design . 3 Hours. This course is intended for those with some computer experience and includes practical hands-on project work. In this course, students learn the principles of the World Wide Web, learn to identify common problems in Web design, plan a web site project and have a practical understanding of how to build, update and publish a web site using a visual editor and HTML. The course is hands-on and production-driven where students learn about web design and authoring through lectures, discussions, demonstrations and through developing actual web pages.

COMP-203. Introduction to Computer Programming: Visual BASIC for WINDOWS . 3 Hours. Visual BASIC is a sophomore level course designed to introduce students to the concept of Object Oriented Event@ program design and coding. Utilizing Window controls and features will be an integral part of these exercises. This course carries a credit of three hours. Prerequisite: Knowledge of an introductory level programming such as BASIC, FORTRAN or C.

COMP-205. Web Design Technologies . 3 Hours. This introductory course introduces the fundamentals of popular Web page design tools and technologies. No prior knowledge of HTML/XHTML or any other languages or tools is required. Students will be introduced to the basics of HTML/XHTML and Cascading Style Sheets. They will also learn basic Web design using the authoring tool Macromedia Dreamweaver. Images and animations will be created by using Adobe PhotoShop, Adobe ImageReady, Macromedia Fireworks and Macromedia Flash. The JavaScript scripting language and Dynamic Hypertext Markup Language (DHTML) may also be examined if time permits.

COMP-212. Computer Programming: C++ . 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of programming in a machine independent language. One will learn the fundamentals to structured programming and object-oriented programming in the language C++. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC or previous knowledge of programming.

COMP-214. Computer Programming: Visual C++ .
3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of programming in a machine independent language. One will learn the fundamentals to structured programming and object-oriented
programming in the language Visual C++. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC or previous knowledge of programming.

COMP-217. Networking Fundamentals . 3 Hours. The main goal of this course is to provide a comprehensive understanding of computer networking. Students will be introduced to the fundamental network building blocks, the types of networks and the concepts behind their operations. They will learn about the network topologies used today and design a network using these topologies. In addition, the vast array of network equipment will be discussed, including hubs, routers, switches and NICs. The course provides a range of laboratory and hands-on assignments that teach the student both the theories behind networking and the steps for bringing a network to reality.

COMP-221. Computer Programming: Java . 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of programming in a machine independent language. One will learn the fundamentals to structured programming and object-oriented programming as well as writing applets for Web pages in the language JAVA. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC or experience with another high-level language.

COMP-226. Computer Programming: JavaScript . 3 Hours. This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of writing computer programs and Web pages using JavaScript. The student will learn all of the tools used in JavaScript and then will integrate them to build a Web page. Some of the tools that will be covered include expressions, decision statements, loops, arrays, functions, strings, events and objects. Prerequisite: Introduction to Computer Programming: BASIC or previous knowledge of programming.

COMP-245. Interactive Authoring: Adobe Director . 3 Hours. This course is an introduction to creating multimedia applications using Macromedia Director MX. Students will learn how to plan and create movies from scratch, import and manage media from other sources, add navigation and user interaction, and prepare and deliver movies for distribution on CD-ROM or the Web.

COMP 256 - Web Graphics . 3 Hours. The main purpose of this course is to instruct students in basic and intermediate graphics design skills primarily for a Web environment and to prepare students for future careers as Web Designers. The basics of graphics design are included, from logos to icons to sliced images. This course affords a wealth of opportunity for hands-on experience using the primary design tools used in industry today.

COMP-276. Presenting With Multimedia . 3 Hours. Multimedia introduces students to the creation and use of business presentations using multimedia software. Multimedia covers evaluation of media for various target audiences, advantages and disadvantages of various presentation methods/media, principles of design and creation of presentations.

COMP-282. Internet Navigation and Exploration . 3 Hours. This course introduces students to the primary
tools of the Internet. Hands-on exercises teach students how to access information from a multitude of different areas

COMP-283. Web Page Design with Microsoft FrontPage . 3 Hours. This course introduces students to the popular Web design program Microsoft FrontPage. Students will be introduced to the World Wide Web and will develop skills in construction of web pages and web sites through tutorials and cases related to business applications. Students will create, publish, test and maintain Web pages using the visual editor.

COMP-287. Web Page Design . 3 Hours. This course introduces students to popular Web design editors. Students will be introduced to the World Wide Web and will develop skills in construction of web pages and web sites through tutorials and cases related to business
applications. Students will create, publish, test and maintain Web pages. Prerequisite: Internet Navigation and Exploration or permission of instructor.

COMP-289. Web Production I . 3 Hours. In this course students will learn how to develop Web sites utilizing the skills they have acquired from previously required Web Design course work. The course will teach students how to manage the Web site development process. In this course students will explore all aspects of Web Production from page design through user testing to uploading and maintenance.

COMP-295. Microcomputer Applications III . 3 Hours. This is a continuation of Microcomputer Applications II. Advanced techniques of a software program and continued use of content learned in Microcomputer Applications II are taught. Prerequisite: Program director must approve selection of MCA course.

COMP-298. Special Projects . 3 Hours. In this course a student will plan and execute a project to enhance their overall understanding of the interactive design. Projects
will follow an individual approach and will include all aspects of the project from conception, design and production. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

COMP-299. Web Production II . 3 Hours. This course is a continuation of Web Production I which will teach the students how to develop Web sites utilizing the skills they have acquired from previously required Web Design course work. The course will teach students how to manage the Web site development process. In this course students will explore all aspects of Web Production from page design through user testing to uploading and maintenance. Prerequisite: Web Production I.

CONT-130. Computer Aided Design Applications . Up to 4 Hours (0-196 Contact Hours). In this course students receive hands-on experience and will learn relevant software and computer applications for Computer Aided Design. This is a short course focused on current CAD software applications.

CONT-140. Beginning Computer Repair/Upgrades . Up to 4 Hours (0-196 Contact Hours). Designed to provide practical hands-on experience with troubleshooting and repair of computers and related equipment, this course focuses on basic computer components, repair procedures, and equipment upgrades.

CONT-170. Graphic Arts/Printing Applications . Up to 4 Hours (0-196 Contact Hours). This course provides students with an opportunity to gain practical knowledge and learn hands-on skills in the printing industry. This is a short course focused on printing applications found in business and industry settings.

CONT-180. Heat/Air Applications . Up to 4 Hours (0-196 Contact Hours). Designed to provide practical hands-on applications of the Heating/Air Conditioning/Ventilation (HVAC) industry, this course provides students with an opportunity to gain knowledge and develop skills in the field. This is a short course focused on trouble-shooting, repair, and installation of HVAC systems.

CONT-220. Advanced Computer Repair/Upgrades . Up to 4 Hours (0-196 Contact Hours). Designed to provide practical hands-on experience with troubleshooting and repair of computers and related equipment, this course focuses on advanced computer repair concepts, repair procedures, and equipment upgrades.

CONT-230. Health Applications . Up to 3 Hours (0-90 Contact Hours). This continuing education course allows students to gain knowledge and practical applications of health-related careers through lecture and lab settings.

DIET-150. Patient/Client Nutrition . 3 Hours (50 Contact Hours). This course serves as an overview of the theory, observation and supervised application of principles of nutrition and modified diets in a clinical setting. Prerequisite: High school diploma or GED, and must be employed in the food service department of a healthcare facility.

DIET-170. Food Facility Personnel . 3 Hours (40 Contact Hours). This course focuses on human resource development and management of food service personnel. Students will learn strategies for hiring, training, supervising and effectively evaluating employees in the food service industry. Prerequisite: High school diploma or GED, and must be employed in the food service department of a healthcare facility.

DIET-200. Food Facility Management . 2 Hours (30 Contact Hours). This course will focus on the application of theories and concepts pertaining to the management and operation of a food service facility. Students will learn about quality control, cost control, safety and ethics in the food service industry. Prerequisite: High school diploma or GED, and must be employed in the food service department of a healthcare facility.

DIET-250. Food Facilities Lab I . 5 Hours (150 Contact Hours). Students will receive hands-on application of theory and practice in food preparation, safety, sanitation, and medical nutrition therapy in a health care food service facility. Prerequisite: High school diploma or GED, and must be employed in the food service department of a healthcare facility.

DIET-255. Food Facilities Lab II . 2 Hours (66 Contact Hours). Students will receive hands-on application of theory and practice in food preparation, safety, sanitation, and medical nutrition therapy in a health care food service facility. Prerequisite: High school diploma or GED, and must be employed in the foodservice department of a healthcare facility.

EDUC-113. Defensive Driving . 1 Hour. This course addresses driving issues, to include: air bags, anti-lock brakes, safety belts, child restraints and substance abuse. Prerequisite: Current driver’s license.

EDUC-190. Commercial Driver’s License . 1 Hour. This course will prepare the student to successfully pass the Kansas Commercial Driver’s License written examination and obtain any necessary endorsements.

EDUC-298. Directed Independent Study (Non-Vocational) . 1-3 Hours. A structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum, intended to allow students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of, and their grasp of
competencies associated with academic, non-vocational disciplines. This class may be used for not more than 6 hours of credit to apply toward a degree.

EDUC-298. DIS: PPST Preparation: Writing . 1 Hour. Pre-Professional Skill Test Preparation: Writing. PPST Preparation is a one-credit hour course designed to help applicants to teacher education adequately prepare for the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) in writing. It provides an intense overview/review of basic skills in the writing area. Individualized evaluation of students’ skill levels will determine the area/areas in which direct instruction will be given to assist in passing the admission and/or certification test. A multimedia approach to curriculum provides teachers-in-training a motivating and challenging means of improving skill abilities.

EDUC-298. DIS: PPST Preparation: Reading . 1 Hour. Pre-Professional Skill Test Preparation: Reading. PPST Preparation is a one-credit hour course designed to help applications to teacher education adequately prepare for the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) in reading. It provides an intense overview/review of basic skills in the reading area. Individualized evaluation of students’ skill levels will determine area/areas in which direct instruction will be given to assist in passing the admission and/or certification test. A multimedia approach to curriculum provides teachers-in-training a motivating and challenging means of improving skill abilities.

EDUC-298. DIS: PPST Preparation: Mathematics. 1 Hour. Pre-Professional Skill Test Preparation: Mathematics. PPST Preparation is a one-credit hour course designed to help applicants to teacher education adequately prepare for the Pre-Professional Skills Test (PPST) in mathematics. It provides an intense overview/review of basic skills in the mathematics area. Individualized evaluation of students skill levels will determine area/areas in which direct instruction will be given to assist in passing the admission and/or certification test. A multimedia approach to curriculum provides teachers-in-training a motivating and challenging means of improving skill abilities.

ELEC-106. Fundamentals of Electricity . 4 Hours (90 Contact Hours). This is an applied science course beginning with atomic structure, electron flow, A.C. and D.C. circuits, continuing through conductor and resistor material types, series and parallel circuits, applying Ohm’s, Watt’s and Kirchoff’s circuit laws and principles, and computing voltage drop.

ELEC-108. Residential Wiring . 8 Hours (235 Contact Hours). This course begins with simple lighting circuits and progresses through installing an entire electrical system for a total electrical home. The student should master the installation of basic circuits, application of codes and blueprint reading, including solar wind and geo-thermal alternative energy sources by the completion of the course.
ELEC-183. Single and Three Phase Motors . 3 Hours (90 Contact Hours). This class begins with the simplest AC motor and progresses through industrial three phase motors. Each student rebuilds motors commonly found in industry. The student will also learn common troubleshooting techniques and how to use the electrical meters employed in motor installation and repair.
ELEC-207. On-the-Job Training (OJT or OJT Equivalent) . 3 Hours (150 Contact Hours). Students demonstrating excellent attendance, attitude and mastery of core curriculum competencies may be considered for on-the-job training experience. Through the cooperation of local businesses, students are given the opportunity to apply the skills required for their future career. Class attendance is also required.
ELEC-215. Motor Controls . 8 Hours (235 Contact Hours). Fully automated machine operation is taught through wiring basic motor control circuits and incorporating control components which give the automated aspects to machine control. Troubleshooting from machine schematics and application of standard troubleshooting techniques are used throughout the class. Photovoltaics and photo detector controls are discussed and utilized.
ELEC-216. Programmable Logic Controllers . 8 Hours (235 Contact Hours). This course combines both hands-on hard wiring installation of Programmable Logic Controllers and program development required to make production machines operate. Heavy emphasis is placed on troubleshooting the system throughout the course.
ELEC-218. Industrial Wiring . 3 Hours (90 Contact Hours). The student will learn to make all conduit bends required for a complete run, tie in single and three phase transformers, and wire out of three phase wye and delta connected panels using industrial wiring methods. Industrial/commercial photovoltaic and solar array applications are also emphasized in accordance with NEC Article 690.
EMTP-105. Technical Rope Rescue - 1. 2 Hours. This is an introductory course designed for individuals interested in becoming involved with high-angle rescues. The course will cover the following topics: rope safety, knots, anchoring, belaying techniques, rappelling and victim rescue. Also, the course serves as a prerequisite for advanced technical rope rescue programs.
EMTP-106. Technical Rope Rescue - 2. 2 Hours. This is an advanced level course for the serious rope technician. The rescuer will learn and practice advanced rigging, rescue skills, team-based rescue and other skills that are used in the Technical Rope environment. The nature of this course is technical and due to the time constraints, intensive. All students enrolled in this course must be well-versed on basic knot skills. The following topics and their accompanying skills include: equipment, knot craft, anchoring, belaying, rappelling, self/victim rescue, team organization and system analysis.
EMTP-114. ACLS Instructor . 1 Hour. This course is designed for currently certified ACLS providers who wish to become instructors of the ACLS curriculum.
EMTP-119. Emergency Medical Responder . 5 Hours. This program addresses information and techniques currently considered to be the responsibilities of the basic life support EMR, according to the Kansas Emergency Medical Services Education Standard. The
course consists of didactic (lecture) instruction, lab skills and Field Internship.
The knowledge required to function as an EMR must be LEARNED as it is inherent as an applied science.
Classroom instruction includes anatomy and physiology and recognition and care of acute medical emergencies and trauma related injuries.
EMTP-132. Instructor - CPR Certification  . 1 Hour. This American Heart Association (AHA) Instructor course is a comprehensive program designed to prepare AHA instructors to disseminate the science, skills and philosophy of resuscitation programs to participants enrolled in AHA courses.
The purpose of this course is to provide instructor candidates with the knowledge and skills necessary to reach and teach potential BLS providers. This course provides a structured initiation for the instructor candidate and serves as the foundation for his/her development. It provides instructor candidates the opportunity to develop and refine their presentation and teaching skills. After completing the course instructor candidates are expected to continue to prepare and practice with guidance from experienced instructors. After a period of mentoring and monitored teaching experiences, the instructor candidate becomes and AHA instructor capable of teaching all AHA BLS courses. Prerequisite: American Heart Association health care provider certificate.
EMTP-142. MICT I . 6 Hours. This course addresses the Medical Overview, Cardiology, and Respiratory Modules of the National DOT Paramedic Curriculum. Review of Basic Patient Assessment components, with the addition of Advanced components are covered. The Cardiology section is an extensive lesson designed to teach a comprehensive approach to the care of patients with cardiovascular compromise. The Respiratory section will include a thorough discussion of the signs/symptoms and assessment findings of disorders or the respiratory system and current therapeutics used to treat them.
EMTP-145. Emergency Medical Services Operations and Management . 1 Hour. This course is based on the operations section of the National DOT Paramedic Curriculum. Lecture presentation will present aspects of pre-hospital medicine. What makes out-of-hospital care different from nursing or medical practice is the field environment and the need to bring care to the patient in that environment. Rather than an easy stroll to the bedside, the foundation of pre-hospital care is the need to bring good patient care to “bad places.” The paramedic must be trained to at least an awareness level in all of the field environments they will encounter. Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; and Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II, Medical Emergencies III, Medical Emergencies IV, Medical Emergencies V, and Clinical Preparatory Lab all with a grade of C or higher.
EMTP-150. MICT II . 3 Hours. This course addresses components of the Kansas Paramedic Instructional Guidelines dealing with pharmacology and medication administration. This course identifies avenues to help the paramedic implement a patient care management plan based on principles and applications of pharmacology, teaches the safe and precise methods of venous access and medication administration and discusses the knowledge necessary to establish and/or maintain a patient airway, and oxygenate and ventilate a patient. The course also presents factors that will enhance therapeutic communications based on life span development of all age groups.
EMTP-155. Pediatric Education for Pre-hospital Professionals (PEPP) . 1 Hour. The PEPP course is designed to give pre-hospital professionals the education and confidence they need to effectively treat pediatric patients. This course of instruction will reinforce and expand on the essential information needed for pre-hospital professionals to assess and treat the pediatric patient. The PEPP course is a dynamic EMS teaching tool that will be subject to ongoing review and modification, in concert with changes in the science of emergency pediatrics and advances in EMS educational design and methodology. Prerequisite: Kansas State and/or National certification at the EMT, EMT-I, EMT-D, or MICT level.
EMTP 158. Paramedic Cardiopulmonary . 4 Hours. This course addresses the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the airway and the heart and its components. Mechanical ventilation and respiration for patients of all ages will be discussed. Assessing patients with respiratory, cardiovascular and hematology problems will be discussed. Equipment used to assess and treat these areas is also discussed.
EMTP 159. Paramedic Cardiopulmonary Lab.
3 Hours. This course addresses the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the airway and the heart and its components. Mechanical ventilation and respiration for patients of all ages will be discussed. Assessing patients with respiratory, cardiovascular and hematology problems will be discussed. Equipment used to assess and treat these areas is also discussed.
EMTP-160. MICT III . 2 Hours. This course covers the Patient Assessment units of the National DOT paramedic curriculum. The course will teach a comprehensive approach to scene assessment, history taking, patient assessment, and field monitoring devices. The course is also designed to provide the paramedic student with a process of clinical decision making that allows him/her to use the assessment findings to form a field impression and develop an emergency care plan.
EMTP-165. Pediatric Pre-hospital Care (PPC) . 1 Hour. This course is designed to give pre-hospital professionals the education and confidence they need to effectively treat pediatric patients. This course of instruction will reinforce and expand on the essential information needed for pre-hospital professionals to assess and treat the pediatric patient. The PPC course is not a one-time effort but rather a dynamic learning experience that will be subject to ongoing review and modification. The emotions triggered when managing the child and family in emergency situations are a special concern commonly raised by pre-hospital providers. Feelings run strong when the pre-hospital provider sees his or her own child in the patient, confronts the injustice of child abuse or neglect or relives the tragedy of a child’s death. Handling parents who may be unreasonable and demanding adds another stressful dimension to the duties of the pre-hospital provider. PPC is aimed at decreasing the uneasiness of pre-hospital care providers to the pediatric patient. Prerequisite: Kansas State and/or National certification at the EMT, EMT-I, EMT-D, or MICT level.
EMTP-168. Paramedic OB/RT/ER Clinical . 1 Hour. This hands-on clinical experience course represents one of the most important components of paramedic education since this is where the student learns to synthesize cognitive and psychomotor skills. This course allows the student to integrate and reinforce the didactic and skills laboratory components that they have practiced in the classroom. The ability to serve in the capacity of an entry-level paramedic requires experience with actual patients. This course enables the student to build a database of patient experiences that serves to help in clinical decision making and pattern recognition.
EMTP-169. Paramedic Special Considerations Clinical . 1 Hour. This hands-on clinical experience course represents one of the most important components of paramedic education since this is where the student learns to synthesize cognitive and psychomotor skills. This course allows the student to integrate and reinforce the didactic and skills laboratory components that they have practiced in the classroom. The ability to serve in the capacity of an entry-level paramedic requires experience with actual patients. This course enables the student to build a database of patient experiences that serves to help in clinical decision making and pattern recognition.
EMTP-172. Medical Emergencies I . 8 Hours. This course addresses the Medical Overview, Cardiology, and Respiratory Modules of the National DOT Paramedic Curriculum. Review of Basic Patient Assessment components, with the addition of Advanced Components are covered. The Cardiology section is an extensive lesson designed to teach a comprehensive approach to the care of patients with cardiovascular compromise. The Respiratory section will include a thorough discussion of the signs/symptoms and assessment findings of disorders or the respiratory system and current therapeutics used to treat them.
EMTP-175. Medical Emergencies I . 5 Hours. This course addresses the Medical Overview and Respiratory Modules of the National DOT Paramedic Curriculum. Review of Basic Patient Assessment components, with the addition of Advanced Components are covered. The Respiratory section will include a thorough discussion of the signs/symptoms and assessment findings of disorders
or the respiratory system and current therapeutics used to treat them.
EMTP-180. Medical Emergencies II . 4 Hours. This course addresses the Shock and Resuscitation, Abdominal & Gastroenterology, Genitourinary & Renal, Neurology, Endocrine, and Allergies and Anaphylaxis modules of the National DOT Paramedic Curriculum. All sections include a review of the pertinent anatomy and physiology and assessment findings associated with each disorder. General pathophysiology and current therapeutics will also be included.
EMTP-185. Paramedic Cardiology . 3 Hours. This course addresses the Medical Overview, Cardiology, and Respitory Modules of the National DOT Paramedic Curriculum. The Cardiology section is an extensive lesson designed to teach a comprehensive approach to the care of patients with cardiovascular compromise.
EMTP-192. Paramedic OB/GYN . 1 Hour. This course addresses the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the labor and delivery of a newborn. Basic and Advanced life support interventions to recognize and manage with patients with gynecologic and obstetric emergencies. The student should be able to respond to the physical, physiologic, and psychosocial needs of patients across the life span.
EMTP-193. Paramedic OB/GYN Lab . 1 Hour. This course addresses the anatomy, physiology and pathophysiology of the labor and delivery of a newborn. Basic and Advanced life support interventions to recognize and manage with patients with gynecologic and obstetric emergencies. The student should be able to respond to the physical, physiologic, and psychosocial needs of patients across the life span.
EMTP-208. Automatic Electric Defibrillation . .5 Hour. The AED mini course is incorporated into the EMT program as required by the Board of EMS, Topeka, Kansas, and requires 8 clock hours to complete. This program addresses information and techniques currently considered to be the responsibilities of the EMT who employs AED’s in their approach, in accordance with local component Medical Society. The program consists of didactic (lecture) instruction and practical skill training.
Classroom instruction includes anatomy and physiology and recognition and care of acute cardiac medical emergencies. Skills in performing CPR, application and safe usage of the AED and other emergency care procedures/considerations are taught and/or reviewed. Prerequisites: High school diploma or GED, valid driver’s license with state of residency, and must be at least 18 years of age.
EMTP-209. Basic Dysrhythmia Interpretation . 4 Hours.
This course is designed to prepare the participant to identify basic cardiac arrhythmias. The emphasis is on recognizing both normal and abnormal patterns, with some knowledge of intervention. The course requires memorization of terms and data presented during the course. Additional study is strongly encouraged.
EMTP-222. Emergency Medical Technology - Intermediate . 3 Hours. Presented in this integrated course are the physiological effects and clinical use of drugs used in advanced, pre-hospital life support. An introduction of drugs that may be administered by the EMT-I in management of acutely ill or injured patients and knowledge of use, action, dosage, side effects, contraindications, mode of administration and antidotes. Body fluids and electrolytes, acid-base balance and parenteral therapy are introduced in this module through lecture presentation.
EMTP-223. EMT Intermediate - Practical Skills/Techniques . 1 Hour. Presented in this integrated course are the physiological effects and clinical use of drugs used in advanced, pre-hospital life support. The course is designed to be held in conjunction with the EMT-I didactic course. Practical application of knowledge gained through study in the EMT-I course will be accomplished in this section. Those skills covered in this section are outlined in the National DOT Curriculum for EMT-I, and are delineated in the general course syllabus.
EMTP-224. EMICT: Advanced Practical Skills/Techniques . 3 Hours. This course requires 76+ clock hours to complete. The course consists of practical skill and didactic review of the entire paramedic program. It is designed to offer the paramedic student the skills and information necessary to successfully challenge the National EMT-P exam and to subsequently be nationally certified to practice as a paramedic in Kansas and other states. Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency, Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II, Medical Emegencies III, Medical Emergencies IV, Medical Emergencies V, Clinical Preparatory Lab, and Clinical Applications all with a grade of C or higher; ACLS certification; approval from Registrar that all general education requirements for AAS degree are fulfilled; proof of MINIMUM malpractice insurance 1,000,000/3,000,000 aggregate; proof of immunizations; Help B SERIES/Titer within 3 years, MMR, Tetanus Toxoid within 5 years and current Tb Tine.
EMTP-225. IV Therapy . 3 Hours. This course meets the requirements in K.S.A. 65-1136 and K.A.R. 60-16-101 to 104, and includes didactic and clinical training covering: 1) Monitoring IV infusions, calculating and maintaining the calculated flow rate of IV infusions, discontinuing IV infusions and removal of peripheral lines, changing IV dressings, observing and reporting subjective and objective signs of adverse reactions to IV administration and documenting observations and procedures performed, while under the supervision of a registered professional nurse. 2) Adding parenteral solutions to existing patient IV lines or by piggyback lines, changing IV tubing, inserting IV fluid therapy cannulas under limited circumstances and maintaining the patency of IV lines with heparin or normal saline, while under the supervision of a registered professional nurse. Prerequisite: Must be a nurse with a current license.
EMTP-230. Field Internship I . 5 Hours. During this course the MICT student will work with trained and certified MICT’s on Type I vehicles and and put into practice the skills and knowledge he/she gained during the previous semesters. Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II, Medical Emergencies III, Medical Emergencies IV, Medical Emergencies V, Clinical Preparatory Lab, Clinical Applications I and Clinical Applications II all with a grade of C or higher; ACLS certification; approval from Registrar that all general education requirements for AAS degree are fulfilled; proof of personal hospitalization insurance; proof of MINIMUM malpractice insurance 1,000,000/3,000,000 aggregate; and proof of immunizations: Hep B SERIES/Titer within 3 years, MMR, Tetanus Toxoid within 5 years and current Tb Tine.
EMTP 233. Emergency Pediatric Care (EPC) . 1 Hour.
This course focuses on the care of sick and injured children, addressing a full spectrum of emergency illnesses, injuries and scenarios that an EMS practitioner might encounter. The course provides an in-depth understanding of the pathophysiology of the most common pediatric emergency issues, and stresses critical thinking skills to help practitioners make the best decisions for their patients.

EMTP-235. Medical Emergencies III . 3 Hours. This course addresses several modules of the National DOT EMT-Paramedic Curriculum to include hematological, environmental emergencies and infectious and communicable diseases. Also included are psychiatric and behavioral disorders. This information on each illness includes epidemiology, pathophysiology, initial assessment findings, focused history, detailed physical exam and management. Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I and Medical Emergencies II all with a grade of C or higher.
EMTP-240. 12 Lead EKG Interpretation . 1 Hour. The 12 Lead course is designed to provide nurses, physicians, paramedics, and other health care professionals with information regarding 12 Lead
Interpretation. Prerequisite: Must possess a valid ACLS card.
EMTP-240. 12 Lead EKG Interpretation . 1 Hour. The 12 Lead course is designed to provide nurses, physicians, paramedics, and other health care professionals with information regarding 12 Lead
Interpretation. Prerequisite: Must possess a valid ACLS card.
EMTP 247 - Field Internship II . 5 Hours. During this course the MICT student will work with trained and certified MICT’s on Type I vehicles and put into practice the skills and knowledge he/she gained during the previous semesters. Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II, Medical Emergencies III, Medical Emergencies IV, Medical Emergencies V, Clinical Preparatory Lab, Clinical Applications I and Clinical Applications II all with a grade of C or higher; ACLS certification; approval from Registrar that all general education requirements for AAS degree are fulfilled; proof of personal hospitalization insurance; proof of MINIMUM malpractice insurance 1,000,000/3,000,000 aggregate; and proof of immunizations: Hep B SERIES/Titer within 3 years, MMR, Tetanus Toxoid within 5 years and current Tb Tine. This is a continuation of EMTP-230 Field Internship I.
EMTP-252. Advanced HAZMAT Life Support (AHLS) . 1 Hour. This course is designed to give pre-hospital and mid-level health care professionals the education and confidence they need to effectively treat hazardous material exposure patients. This course of instruction will reinforce and expand on the essential information needed for pre-hospital and in-hospital professionals to assess and treat the exposed HAZMAT patient. The course is a dynamic teaching tool that will be subject to ongoing review and modification, in concert with changes in the science of emergency and clinical advances in HAZMAT educational design and methodology. Prerequisite: Kansas State and/or National certification at the EMT, EMT-I, EMT-D, or MICT level; advanced and mid-level health care providers.
EMTP-260. Medical Emergencies IV . 2 Hours. This course addresses the gynecology, obstetrics and neonatology modules of the National DOT EMT-Paramedic Curriculum. This course separates gynecological emergencies from obstetrical emergencies in an effort to provide a more detailed understanding of the anatomic structures and physiology of the female reproductive system. Only through understanding the proper assessment can the findings be used to formulate a field impression that enables the paramedic to structure an appropriate treatment plan. This course covers gynecologic emergencies that present with excessive bleeding and/or abdominal pain. It also focuses on the need for protecting patient privacy, providing care for sexual assault and protecting crime scene evidence.
The course also provides a detailed understanding of the anatomic structures and physiology of the female reproductive system as it relates to the process of childbirth. It differentiates between normal and abnormal delivery, and covers topics including abdominal pain, excessive vaginal bleeding and hypertensive crisis as well as providing a thorough discussion of childbirth preparation, normal delivery, abnormal delivery and post-delivery care for both the mother and newborn.
Neonatology, i.e., a recently born infant, is addressed as a component of this course. Treatment strategies and specific situations include meconium stained amniotic fluid, apnea, diaphragmatic hernia, bradycardia (both of which have high mortality rates), premature infants and respiratory distress. Hypoglycemia, which has serious ramifications, is included. Common birth injuries and aspects of mechanical and anoxic trauma are also addressed. Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; and Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II and Medical Emergencies III all with a grade of C or higher.
EMTP-270. Medical Emergencies V . 3 Hours. This course addresses the pediatric, geriatric and abuse and assault module of the National DOT EMT-Paramedic Curriculum.
The pediatric section includes the priorities, assessment and treatment protocols from the Emergency Medical Services for Children (EMSC) project and outlines its objectives. The course reinforces information from the neonatology section and provides an ample unit on developmental aspects that cover physical, cognitive and emotional guideposts. Included are implications for paramedic use. The anatomic and physiological section is a review of previous material and is succinctly treated. The assessment section includes a transition phase from initial assessment to the focus history. This is an important distinction that alerts the paramedic to allow the child to become familiar with the advanced sections. Specific pathophysiologic problems include respiratory compromise, shock, dysrhythmias, seizures, hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, infection and poisoning and toxic exposure. The pediatric trauma approach is more specific and is guided by the latest edition of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) program for physicians by the American College of Surgeons, Committee on Trauma. Child abuse and neglect, as well as children with special needs, are included.
The geriatric section addresses the special needs of the elderly. Included are presentations on demographics, the effect of aging on body systems, altered physiology, multiple coexisting diseases, nonspecific and atypical presentations, limitations of mobility, self-care and the marked influence of the social system. The course emphasizes understanding the special needs of the elderly, the changes that the aging process brings about in physical structure, body composition and organ function will be a fundamental knowledge base in maintenance of life support functions. The special health care problems of the elderly - diabetes, hearing and visual impairment, hypertension, arthritis and cardiovascular disease and their complications in treatment are covered.
This course also includes information on a variety of “challenged” patients. This includes patients with physical challenges (hearing, visual and speech impairments, obesity, and paraplegia/quadriplegia), mental challenges (mental illness, developmental disability, emotional impairments), and challenges with chronic diseases (arthritis, cancer, cerebral palsy, systic fibrosis, multiple sclerosis, muscular dystrophy, poliomyelitis, head injuries, spina bifida and myasthenia gravis). Content in each of these areas includes a description of the challenge and accommodations that may be necessary in its assessment and management. This section concludes with discussion of four additional challenged groups: culturally diverse, terminally ill, those with communicable disease and financially challenged.
This course concludes with providing the knowledge and perspective to manage patients who are receiving complex medical care in a nontraditional setting. Although acute intervention from home care is the primary focus, the student also gains knowledge about extended-care and hospice facilities. After addressing the type of chronic care patients, the section provides general pathophysiology of body systems, assessment and management knowledge and skills. The section concludes with specific, acute home-health situations. Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; and Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II, Medical Emergencies III and Medical Emergencies IV all with a grade of C or higher.
EMTP-275. Training Officer I . 1 Hour. This program is designed for those individuals interested in providing and/or coordinating approved single program provider continuing EMS education programs in the State of Kansas. It will provide the participant with opportunities to gain information and practice as a Training Officer I in the State of Kansas.
The Kansas Board of EMS has approved this program. It addresses information and techniques currently considered to be the responsibilities of the TO I according to the Kansas Board of EMS. Curriculum includes sections of the National DOT Standard Curriculum for EMS Instructors, Kansas Basic Life Support Skills Task Analysis and applicable statutes and regulations. Prerequisite: Currently certified at or above the EMT level, or as a physician licensed to practice medicine and surgery or licensed professional nurse. Local appointing authority must appoint the candidate.
EMTP-280. Clinical Preparatory Laboratory . 2 Hours. This laboratory course is designed for the student who has successfully completed the majority of the didactic courses in the paramedic curricula. It is intended to allow the student to “put the whole experience together.” This unit focuses on patient assessment-based management and contains information and practice scenarios to help students apply the fundamentals of patient care. The course contains didactic presentation on “putting it all together” and then shifts to common chief complaint categories. The students practice acting as a team leader and partner doing assessment, initial resuscitation, scene choreography, treatment and patient presentation. Most of the common chief complaints that paramedics will encounter in the field are included in this unit. Next to actually being in the field, these scenarios with programmed patients and actual equipment are one of the best ways to take the mountain of theoretical material and focus it. It is also an excellent way to begin developing “team leadership” skills that are critical to actually being an effective field paramedic. The student will be afforded opportunities to develop effective teamwork prior to entering the clinical and field phases of the paramedic curricula.
Additionally, this course affords laboratory practice time for the student to review and “fine tune” Type I skills necessary for the student to enter the clinical area. Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; and Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II, Medical Emergencies III, Medical Emergencies IV, and Medical Emergencies V all with a grade of C or higher.
EMTP-285. Training Officer II . 2 Hours. This program is designed for those individuals interested in providing and/or coordinating approved single program provider continuing EMS education programs in the State of Kansas. It will provide the participant with opportunities to gain information and practice as a Training Officer II in the State of Kansas.
The Kansas Board of EMS has approved this program. It addresses information and techniques currently considered to be the responsibilities of the TO II according to the Kansas Board of EMS. Curriculum includes sections of the National DOT Standard Curriculum for EMS Instructors, Kansas Basic Life Support Skills Task Analysis and applicable statutes and regulations. Prerequisite: Currently certified at or above the EMT level, or as a physician licensed to practice medicine and surgery or licensed professional nurse. Candidate must have current approval as a Training Officer I. Local appointing authority must appoint the candidate.
EMTP-290. Clinical Applications I . 3 Hours. This hands-on clinical experience course represents one of the most important components of paramedic education since this is where the student learns to synthesize cognitive and psychomotor skills. This course allows the student to integrate and reinforce the didactic and skills laboratory components of the program. The ability to serve in the capacity of an entry-level paramedic requires experience with actual patients. This course enables the student to build a database of patient experiences that serves to help in clinical decision making and pattern recognition.
Minimum patient contacts have been specified to assure each student is offered diversity and repetitive practice in specific areas. Time-based minimums in each area of clinical practice are listed as a scheduling guideline only. Minimum patient contacts, as well as minimum clock hours, MUST be attained for the student to receive a passing grade. A student must complete a MINIMUM of 170 clock hours in the emergency room, OB/GYN, Surgery/Recovery Room, with the Medical Director, in other areas of a medical facility as assigned.
Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II, Medical Emergencies III, Medical Emergencies IV, Medical Emergencies V, and Clinical Preparatory Lab all with a grade of C or higher; proof of personal hospitalization insurance; proof of MINIMUM malpractice insurance 1,000,000/3,000,000 aggregate; and proof of immunizations: Hep B SERIES/Titer within 3 years, MMR, Tetanus Toxoid within 5 years and Tb Tine within 6 months.
EMTP-291. Clinical Applications II . 2 Hours. This course is a continuation of Clinical Applications I. This hands-on clinical experience course represents one of the most important components of paramedic education since this is where the student learns to synthesize cognitive and psychomotor skills. This course allows the student to integrate and reinforce the didactic and skills laboratory components of the program. The
ability to serve in the capacity of an entry-level paramedic requires experience with actual patients. This course enables the student to build a database of patient experiences that serves to help in clinical decision making and pattern recognition.
Minimum patient contacts have been specified to assure each student is offered diversity and repetitive practice in specific areas. Time-based minimums in each area of clinical practice are listed as a scheduling guideline only. Minimum patient contacts, as well as minimum clock hours, MUST be attained for the student to receive a passing grade.
Because of the unpredictable nature of emergency medicine, the hospital environment offers two advantages in paramedic education: volume and specificity. In the hospital setting, the paramedic student can see many more patients than is possible in the field. This is a very important component in building up a “library” of patient care experiences to draw upon in clinical decision making.

The use of multiple departments within the hospital enables the student to see an adequate distribution of patient situations. This course takes advantage of critical care units, OB/GYN, operating rooms/ anesthesia, recovery, pediatrics, psychiatric, doctors offices, clinics, laboratories, pharmacies, day care centers, well baby clinics, and community and public health centers. A student must complete a MINIMUM of 114 clock hours in the emergency room, OB/GYN, Surgery/Recovery Room, with the Medical Director, and in other areas of a medical facility as assigned.
Prerequisites: EMT Certification; current driver’s license with state of residency; Anatomy and Physiology, MICT I, MICT II, MICT III, Medical Emergencies I, Medical Emergencies II, Medical Emergencies III, Medical Emergencies IV, Medical Emergencies V, Clinical Preparatory Lab, and Clinical Applications I all with a grade of C or higher; proof of personal hospitalization insurance; proof of MINIMUM malpractice insurance 1,000,000/3,000,000 aggregate; and proof of immunizations: Hep B SERIES/Titer within 3 years, MMR, Tetanus Toxoid within 5 years and Tb Tine within 6 months.
EMTP-295. Kansas BEMS Instructor Coordinator.
9 Hours. This program is designed for those individuals interested in providing and/or coordinating First Responder and EMT initial training courses and approved EMS continuing education programs in the State of Kansas. It will provide the participant with opportunities to gain information needed to practice as an I/C in the State of Kansas. The Kansas Board of EMS has approved this program. It addresses information and techniques currently considered to be the responsibilities of the I/C according to the Kansas Board of EMS. Curriculum is based upon the 2002 National Guidelines for Educating EMS instructors (NAEMSE), Kansas enrichments as mandated/ recommended by the Kansas Education and Examination Taskforce, Kansas Basic Life Support Skills Task Analysis and applicable statutes and regulations. Prerequisite: Current certification at or above the EMT level, or a physician licensed to practice medicine and surgery in the State of Kansas or a licensed professional nurse; proof of one of the following: Training Officer II, Kansas teaching certificate; certification as a CPR instructor at the professional level; proof of one (1) year of EMS street experience; letter of commitment from a certified IC stating intent of mentorship and three professional letters of recommendation.
EMTP-299. Critical Care Emergency Medical Transport Program . 9 Hours. This course is designed to provide paramedics, physicians, physician assistants and nurses an in-depth approach to critical care patient management. Prerequisite: Two years experience as a paramedic, registered nurse, physician assistant or licensed physician with a current CPR, ACLS, PALS, PHTLS or BTLS certification. Nursing may exchange PHTLS/BTLS for TNCC.
ENGL-100. Debate Workshop . 2 Hours. Class by appointment for an intensive study of argumentation and debate. May be taken four (4) times for college credit.
ENGL-103. English Composition I : Honors. 3 Hours. This course provides outstanding students with challenging writing assignments to assist them in
mastering the expository and argumentative modes of composition. Critical thinking skills are emphasized.
Prerequisite: Students must have been selected to
participate in the CCC Honors Program or have permission of the instructor.
ENGL-113. Beginning American Sign Language . 3 Hours. This course is a basic introduction to American Sign Language and will lay the foundation for building signs for future ASL (American Sign Language) courses. ASL questions, commands, vocabulary and sentence structure will be covered. Expressive and receptive sign vocabulary building will be taught through class activities leading to basic conversational skills in ASL.
ENGL 114 - Basic Reading Tutoring Techniques . 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide an opportunity to practice professionally accepted approaches and techniques with step-by-step instructions with tutoring basic literacy. Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.
ENGL-115. English Composition II: Honors . 3 Hours. This course builds on the foundations of English Composition I: Honors. Emphasis is on analytic reading, critical thinking, expository writing and incisive research - both primary and secondary. Prerequisites: English Composition I: Honors with a C or above. Enrollees must be members of the CCC Honors Program, or obtain permission from the Honors Program Coordinator.
ENGL-123. Advanced American Sign Language . 3 Hours. This course is an advanced section of American Sign Language. It is designed for those wanting to expand their vocabulary to the next level. Acquisition of advanced conversational fluency incorporating idiomatic signed expressions will be taught. Prerequisite: Beginning American Sign Language.

ENGL-201. Advanced Composition . 3 Hours. Analysis of effective writing of past and present with critical writing assignments aimed at developing advanced skill in communication of ideas. Research is covered. Prerequisite: English Composition I and English Composition II.
ENGL-212. Seminar in Shakespeare . 3 Hours. This general education humanities class is a course of critical reading and evaluation of selected plays and sonnets by William Shakespeare. This is accomplished by reading and discussing selected works. Prerequisite: English Composition I.
ENGR-101. Engineering Graphics I . 3 Hours. This course includes the geometry of engineering drawing. Topics covered include engineering lettering and freehand sketching, graphical solution of problems in three dimensions and the graphical representation of points, lines and planes.
ENGR-102. Engineering Graphics II . 3 Hours. This includes graphical representation of the solution of engineering problems, charts and graphs, nomography, vectors, principles of dimensioning, section and working drawing. Prerequisite: Engineering Graphics I.
FACS-102. Introduction to Nutrition . 3 Hours. This course emphasizes the basic principles of normal nutrition in relation to individual and family health throughout the life cycle. Socio-psychological aspects as well as physiological aspects of nutrition are included. The six major nutrients will be investigated for their function in the body and sources in the diet. Participation in projects is required.
FACS-104. Meal Management . 3 Hours. Principles of meal planning and service. Buying principles are also considered.
FACS-106. Housing and Interior Design . 3 Hours. This course consists of a study of period architecture, interiors, furniture styles, floor plans, art principles and color, woods and wood furniture construction, floral arrangement, lighting, kitchen planning, windows and walls and use of home accessories. Field trips are an integral part of the course.
FACS-116. Housing and Interior Design Seminar .
3 Hours. This is a course designed to offer the student a study of housing terms, architectural styles and period furniture. Restorations of colonial architecture and ante-bellum homes are included. The second half of the course deals with a study of famous homes.

FACS-120. Consumer Education . 3 Hours. The
course is designed to assist consumers to buy products
and services efficiently (1) by using resources available to them, (2) by increasing their problem-solving and decision-making skills, and (3) by offering very practical help in buying food, clothing, transportation, furniture, housing, insurance and credit. Budgeting, consumer fraud and cost-comparison projects are a part of the
course.
FACS-140. Sanitation and Safety . 1 Hour. This course will be an introductory study of safe food handling techniques and safety for the food service worker. Foodborne illnesses and their causes will be studied. The implementation of the HACCP system will be emphasized.
FACS-142. Introduction to Hospitality Management (Sanitation and Safety) . 3 Hours. Upon successful completion of this course the student will be able to understand and describe the organization of the food service and public lodging industries. The student will also be able to describe the departmental functions, the positions of the industries in the American economic system, functions and limitations of these types of establishments. Career opportunities in the hospitality management field will be explored. This course will also include an introductory study of sanitation and safety throughout the hospitality industry.
FIRE-160. Pumping Apparatus Driver/Operator .
3 Hours. This course details the important responsibilities of firefighters who are assigned to drive and operate a fire department vehicle that is equipped with a fire pump. The purpose of the course is to present general principles of pump operations, along with the application of those principles wherever feasible. It is also meant to guide driver/operators in the proper operation and care of apparatus. This course serves as an overview of qualities and skills needed by driver/operator, safe driving techniques, types of pumping apparatus, positioning of apparatus to maximize efficiency and water supply, fire pump theory and operation, hydraulic calculations, water supply considerations, relay pumping principles, water supply procedures, foam systems operation, and apparatus maintenance and testing.
FIRE-170. Fire Service Hydraulics & Water Supply . 3 Hours. The purpose of this course is to allow firefighters to become more professional in the area of fire service hydraulics. This course will not only explain how various equipment or equations work, but why they work and why firefighters need to know them. The information contained in this course is designed to meet the objectives put forth in the model course outlined for Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply as established by the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) initiative led by the United States Fire Administration (USFA). Every effort will be made in this course to demonstrate and explain how equipment and theory have benefited from modern technology. The firefighter student will be instructed in the most modern, efficient, and simplest manner of performing the task at hand. In some cases the older methods will also be demonstrated and explained to provide a detailed understanding of the physical characteristics of water and the scientific principle of its movement.
FIRE-171. Fire Service Hydraulics & Water Supply Lab . 3 Hours. The purpose of this course is to allow firefighters to become more professional in the area of fire service hydraulics. This course will not only explain how various equipment or equations work, but why they work and why firefighters need to know them. The information contained in this course is designed to meet the objectives put forth in the model course outlined for Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply as established by the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) initiative led by the United States Fire Administration (USFA). Every effort will be made in this course to demonstrate and explain how equipment and theory have benefited from modern technology. The firefighter student will be instructed in the most modern, efficient, and simplest manner of performing the task at hand. In some cases the older methods will
also be demonstrated and explained to provide a detailed understanding of the physical characteristics of water and the scientific principle of its movement.
FIRE-180. Fire Investigator . 3 Hours. This course addresses the basic skills needed to conduct fire investigations. Successful methods are demonstrated for conducting legal fire investigations that culminate, when appropriate, in prosecution for arson. Upon successful completion of the course, the students will be equipped to identify the origin and cause of a fire, and conduct a technically and legally sound investigation. Subjects covered include behavior of fire, health and safety, determining point of origin, accidental and incendiary fire cause determination, motivation of the fire-setter, fire scene investigation and follow-up techniques, fire protection systems, vehicle fires, fatal fires, incendiary devices, legal aspects, interview techniques, evidence, and report writing.
FIRE-220. Fire & Emergency Service Instructor I . 3 Hours. The purpose of this course is to provide fire and emergency services instructor candidates with basic instructional knowledge. This knowledge is necessary to develop skills for preparing and presenting training for personnel of fire and emergency service organizations through a variety of instructional methods. Fire and Emergency Service Instructor Level I will be responsible for assembling course materials, delivering a prepared lesson plan, managing instructional resources, using instructional aids and evaluation tools, and reviewing and adapting lesson plans to meet the training and instructional needs of the target group. Fire and Emergency Service Instructor Level I also prepares and maintains accurate training records in accordance with the requirements of the jurisdiction.
FLNG-100. Conversational Spanish . 3 Hours. This course teaches the language by practice. Grammar and structure are taught, but the concentration is on conversational usage in everyday situations. Vocabulary and pronunciation are practiced.
FLNG-105. German I . 3 Hours. This course will introduce the student to the German language and the culture of the German speaking people. Emphasis is on developing fundamental oral and written vocabulary and grammar.
FLNG-106. German II . 3 Hours. This course is designed to continue with the introduction of the German language and to offer advanced phrases and vocabulary to the presentation of the second level of the German language. Prerequisite: German I.
FLNG-110. Conversational Spanish II . 3 Hours. This course is a continuation of Conversational Spanish. It teaches the language by practice. Grammar and structure are taught but the concentration is on conversational usage in everyday situations. Vocabulary and pronunciation are practiced. Prerequisite: Conversational Spanish or permission of instructor.
FLNG-201. French III . 3 Hours. This course is a continuation of the study of the structure of the French language through listening, speaking and reading. Prerequisite: French II or its equivalent.
FLNG-202. French IV . 3 Hours. This course is a review of the structure of the language with emphasis upon reading of modern French. Prerequisite: Instructor permission.
FLNG-206. German III . 3 Hours. This course will expand the communicative skills. Cultural understanding will increase and oral communication will continue through situations between students and
through listening to tapes. Prerequisite: German I and German II.
FLNG-207. German IV . 3 Hours. This course will further expand the study of the German language. This course will be taught entirely in German. Prerequisite: German I, German II and German III.
GOVN-106. Comparative Government . 3 Hours. This course is a survey of the twentieth century evolution of the political systems of Britain, Germany and Russia.
GOVN-107. Introduction to International Relations . 3 Hours. This course is a survey of the international relations of the Great Powers from the turn of the twentieth century to the present, emphasizing the origins of war, the Cold War and current events.
HAZW-130. Hazardous Materials Regulations I .
3 Hours. This course will provide a historical overview of the occupation, consumer and environmental health and safety issues. The student will be introduced to past and present government regulations which helped shape the worker, consumer and environmental protection programs in the United States. Emphasis will be placed on identifying applicable OSHA regulations, interpreting them and recommending compliance strategies.
HAZW-140. Industrial Processes . 3 Hours. Emphasis is placed on where hazardous materials are used and generated in various types of industrial processes. Understanding the constraints of product lines are discussed. Special attention is paid to potential acute
and chronic hazard exposures from various industrial processes. Co-Requisite: Organic Chemistry.
HAZW-150. Hazard Communication Standard . 3 Hours. This course is designed to provide instruction concerning the development and implementation of a hazard communication program for employees, the community and emergency response personnel. Topics
covered include hazard determination, the written program, labeling and placarding, material safety data sheets (MSDS) and the employee training program.
HAZW-220. HAZWOPER (Initial/Emergency Response Technician) . 3 Hours. This course is designed for personnel involved in hazardous waste operations who must comply with the training requirements of 29 CFR 1910.120. It addresses safety issues associated with hazardous materials, including hazard recognition, personal protective equipment, toxicology, monitoring equipment and procedures, first aid, site control and contingency planning.
HAZW-230. Hazardous Materials Regulations II . 3 Hours. An in-depth study of the Environmental Protection Agency including the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA); the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA); the Toxic Substance Control Act (TSCA); the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act (FIFRA); and other clean air, land and water issues. Emphasis will be placed on developing methods and strategies to ensure regulatory compliance. Prerequisite: Hazardous Materials Regulations I.
HAZW-235. Hazardous Materials Regulations III .
3 Hours. Determine the applicability of federal, state and local regulations dealing with hazardous materials. Emphasis will be placed on obtaining an understanding of transportation regulations and emergency response regulations. Prerequisite: Hazardous Materials Regulations I and II.
HAZW-240. Emergency Response I . 3 Hours. This course is designed to teach students how to develop an emergency response contingency plan for a facility. Preparedness includes analyzing the hazards, writing and implementing the contingency plans, training employees for an emergency and evaluating the effectiveness of the contingency plan.
HAZW-245. Emergency Response II . 3 Hours. This course covers the coordination and implementation of emergency response procedures. Through simulated emergencies, students will assess the incident, respond to the emergency, supervise clean-up and provide public relations information. Prerequisite: Hazard Communication Standard or Hazardous Materials Regulations I, Emergency Response I. Hazardous
Materials Regulations III should be taken concurrently or before Emergency Response II.
HAZW-250. Hazardous Materials Health Effects .
4 Hours. A review of the research done to determine the systematic health effects of exposure of chemicals.
Topics covered include determination of risk factors, route of entry of hazardous materials and their effects
on target organs, acute and chronic effects and control measures. Prerequisite: Anatomy and Physiology I.
HAZW-251. Hazardous Materials Recovery, Incineration and Disposal . 3 Hours. The course is designed to explain the methods of recovery, incineration and/or disposal of hazardous waste. Topics include contracting qualified disposal organizations, obtaining permits and ensuring regulatory compliance
of hazardous waste. Prerequisite: Fundamentals of Chemistry.
HAZW-260. Sampling and Analysis . 5 Hours. Emphasis is placed on the methodology of sampling, analyzing and interpreting results of analysis of hazardous materials. The program will include industrial hygiene monitoring, testing pH and moisture content, selecting analytical service laboratories and an introduction to chemical methods of analysis including spectroscopy and chromatography. Prerequisite: Organic Chemistry.
HAZW-293. Industrial Safety . 2 Hours. This course is designed to teach basic safety instruction in hazard communication, confined space and lockout/tagout awareness, fire extinguisher (selection and use), blood borne pathogens, cardiopulmonary resuscitation and first aid.
HIST-109. Seminar in American History . 3 Hours. This course uses the seminar approach to study the Civil War and reconstruction. Causes and consequences of intersectional strife from 1850-1877 are explored. Special emphasis is placed on the concept of living history. Prerequisite: Early U.S. History or permission of instructor.
HIST-110. Early European History . 3 Hours. The historical development of various European cultures, with emphasis on economic, political and social forces that shaped European History to 1500.
HIST-111. Modern European History . 3 Hours. A study of European cultures from 1500 through the World Wars. Special emphasis is placed on the interplay of political and economic forces that shaped modern Europe.
HIST-209. U. S. History Seminar II . 3 Hours. This course is designed for students with a special interest in the field of Civil War and reconstruction history. Special emphasis is placed on historical research and independent study. Prerequisite: Seminar in American History.
HIST-225. Western Civilization I . 3 Hours. This course is a program of study which, within a historical framework, emphasizes the reading and discussion of influential writings and ideas that have shaped the intellectual and cultural heritage of the Western World during its ancient, medieval, and early modern periods.